Categories

Reference List

International/General:

Akinsha, Konstantin. Kozlov, Grigorii and Sylvia Hochfield. Stolen Treasure: The Hunt for the World’s Lost Masterpieces. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1995.

Alford, Kenneth D. Nazi Plunder: Great Treasure Stories of World War II. Cambridge, MA: Da Capo, 2001.

—. The Spoils of World War II: The American Military’s Role in the Stealing of Europe’s Treasures. New York: Carol Publishing Group, 1994.

Atwood, Roger. Stealing History:  Tomb Raiders, Smugglers, and the Looting of the Ancient World. New York: St. Martin’s Griffin, 2004.

Barron, Stephanie. Exiles and emigreés: the flight of European artists from Hitler. New York: Harry Abrams, 1997. 

Borak, Mecislav. „The West“ Versus „The East“ or the United Europe? The different conceptions of provenance research, documentation and indemnification of looted cultural assets and the possibilities of international cooperation in Europe and worldwide. Proceedings of an international academic conference held in Podebrady on 8-9 October 2013. Documentation Centre for Property Transfers of Cultural Assets of WWII Victims, Prague 2014.

Brodie, Nicholas. Illicit Antiquities: The Destruction of the World’s Archaeological Heritage. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, 2001.

Clark, Ian Christie and Lewis E. Levy. National Legislation to Encourage International Cooperation: The Challenge to Our Cultural Heritage. Paris: UNESCO, 1986.

Clinefelter, Joan Lucinda. The German Art Society and the battle for “pure German” art, 1920-1945. PhD Dissertation. Indiana University, 1995

Chamberlin, E. R. Loot!: The Heritage of Plunder. New York: Facts on File, 1983.

De Jaeger, Charles. The Linz File: Hitler’s Plunder of Europe’s Art. Exeter: Webb & Bower, 1981.

DeAngelis, Ildiko P. “How Much Provenance Research is Enough? Post-Schultz Guidelines for Art Museum Acquisition of Archaeological Materials and Ancient Art.” Barbara T. Hoffmann (ed.) Art and Cultural Heritage: Law, Policy, and Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006, pp.398-408.

Edsel, Robert M. The Monuments Men: Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves, and the Greatest Treasure Hunt in History. New York: Center Street, 2009.

Feigenbaum, Gail and Inge J. Reist. (ed.) Provenance: An Alternative History of Art. Los Angeles, Getty Research Institute, 2013.

Felch, Jason and Ralph Frammolino. Chasing Aphrodite: The Hunt for Looted Antiquities at the World’s Richest Museum. New York, 2011.

Feliciano, Hector. The Lost Museum: The Nazi Conspiracy to Steal the World’s Greatest Works of Art. New York: BasicBooks, 1997.

Fishman, David. The Book Smugglers: Partisans, Poets and the Race to Save Jewish Treasures from the Nazis. The True Story of the Paper Brigade of Vilna. Lebanon: Fore Edge, 2017.

Fleckner, Uwe. “Marketing the defamed: on the contradictory use of provenances in the Third Reich.” Feigenbaum, Gail and Inge J. Reist. (ed.) Provenance: An Alternative History of Art. Los Angeles, Getty Research Institute, 2013, pp. 137-153. 

Gensburger, Sarah. Witnessing the Robbing of the Jews. A Photographic Album, Paris, 1940-1944. Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2015.

Glickman, Mark. Stolen Words: The Nazi Plunder of Jewish Books. Lincoln, Philadelphia: University of Nebraska Press, 2016.

Goodman, Simon. The Orpheus Clock: The Search for My Family’s Art Treasures Stolen by the Nazis. New York: Scribner, 2016.

Grosshans, Henry. Hitler and the artists. New York: Holmes and Meirer, 1983.

Hansen, Tone. Looters, Smugglers, and Collectors: Provenance Research and the Market: Provenance Research and the Market. Köln: Walther König, 2015.

Harclerode, Peter, and Brendan Pittaway. The Lost Masters: World War II and the Looting of Europe’s Treasurehouses. New York: Welcome Rain Publishers, 2000.

Hinz, Berthold. Art in the Third Reich. New York: Random House, 1979.

Hoffman, Barbara T. Art and Cultural Heritage: Law, Policy, and Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Honan, William H. Treasure Hunt: A New York Times Reporter Tracks the Quedlinburg Hoard. New York: Fromm International, 1997.Fr

Howe, Thomas Carr. Salt Mines and Castles: The Discovery and Restitution of Looted European Art. New York: Bobbs Merrill, 1946.

Jones, Lois Swan. Art Information and the Internet: how to Find It, how to Use It. Phoenix: Oryx Press, 1999.

Kurz, Jakob. Kunstraub in Europa 1939-1945. Hamburg: Facta Oblita, 1989.

Lehmann-Haupt, Hellmut. Art under a dictatorship. New York: Oxford, 1954.

Maser, Werner. Hitler’s Letters and Notes. New York: Harper and Row, 1973.

Mc Donald, Frank. Provenance. London: Macdonald, 1980.

Mackenzie, Simon, Neil Brodie, and Donna Yates. Trafficking Culture: New Directions in Researching the Global Market in Illicit Antiquities. New York: Routledge, 2020.

Meyer, Karl E. The Plundered Past: The Story of the Illegal International Traffic in Works of Art.  New York: 1973.

McNulty, Tom. Art Market Research: a guide to methods and sources. Jefferson: McFarland & Co., 2006.

Milosch, Jane and Nick Pearce. Collecting Provenance: A Multidisciplinary Approach. London: Rowman & Littlefield, 2019.

Moorehead, Caroline. The Lost Treasures of Troy. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1994.

Nicholas, Lynn H. The Rape of Europa: The Fate of Europe’s Treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War. New York: Vintage Books, 1995.

Noblecourt, André. Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict. Paris: UNESCO, 1958.

O’Donnell, Nicholas. A Tragic Fate: Law and Ethics in the Battle Over Nazi-Looted Art. Chicago: American Bar Association, 2017. [eBook]

Pearson, David. Provenance research in book history: a handbook. London: Bodleian Library, 2019.

Perry, Victor. Stolen Art. New York: Gefen, 2000.

Petropoulos, Jonathan. Art as Politics in the Third Reich. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996.

—. The Faustian Bargain: The Art World in Nazi Germany. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.

—. Artists Under Hitler: Collaboration and Survival in Nazi Germany.  New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014.

—. Goering’s Man in Paris. The Story of a Nazi Art Plunderer and His World. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2021.

Posner, Ernst. Memorandum Concerning the Protection and Salvage of Cultural Objects and Records in War Areas. Washington: American Council of Learned Societies, 1944.

Rabinbach, Anson and Gail Stavitsky. Assault on the arts: culture and politics in Nazi Germany. New York: New York Public Library, 1993.

Redmond-Cooper, Ruth. Museums and the Holocaust. Crickadarn: Institute of Art and Law, 2021.

Renold, Marc Andre, et al. Cross-Border Restitution Claims of Art Looted in Armed Conflicts and Wars and Alternatives to Court Litigations: Study for the Juri Committee. Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs, 2016.

Rorimer, James Joseph. Survival: the Salvage and Protection of Art in War. New York: Abelard, 1950.

Roxan, David and Ken Wanstall. The Rape of Art: The Story of Hitler’s Plunder of the Great Masterpieces of Europe. New York: Coward-McCann, 1965.

Rydell, Anders. The Book Thieves: The Nazi Looting of Europe’s Libraries and the Race to Return a Literary Inheritance. New York: Viking, 2017.

Savoy, Bénédicte. Bodenstein, Felicity and Merten Lagatz. Translocations: Histories of Dislocated Cultural Assets. Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag, 2021.

Simpson, Elizabeth. The Spoils of War: World War II and Its Aftermath: The Loss, Reappearance, and Recovery of Cultural Property. New York: H.N. Abrams, 1997.

Tompkins, Arthur. Provenance Research Today: Principles, Practice, Problems. London: Lund Humphries, 2020.

Trienens, Howard J. Landscape with Smokestacks: The Case of the Allegedly Plundered Degas. Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 2000.

Rousseau, Theodore. The Goering Collection. Washington: Office of Strategic Service, Art Looting Investigation Unit, 1945.

Schnabel, Gunnar and Monika Tatzkow. Nazi Looted Art: Handbuch Kunstrestitution Weltweit. Berlin: Proprietas-Verlag, 2007.

Terezín Declaration – ten years later: 7th International Conference: the documentation, identification and restitution of the cultural assets of WWII victims: proceedings of an international academic conference held in Prague on 18-19 June, 2019. Prague: Documentation Centre for Property Transfers of Cultural Assets of WW II Victims, 2019.

Vlug, Jean. Report on Objects Removed to Germany from Holland, Belgium, and France during the German Occupation of the Countries. Amsterdam: Report of Stichting Nederlands Kunstbesit, 1945.

Weller, Matthias. Kemle, Nicolai. Dreier, Thomas and Karolina Kuprecht. Raubkunst und Restitution – Zwischen Kolonialzeit und Washington PrinciplesTagungsband des Dreizehnten Heidelberger Kunstrechtstags am 18. und 19. Oktober 2019. Baden-Baden: Nomos Dike Verlag Zürich/St. Gallen facultas, 2020.

Winkelmann, Andreas, et al. Sammeln, Erforschen, Zurückgeben? Menschliche Gebeine aus der Kolonialzeit in akademischen und musealen Sammlungen. Berlin: Christoph Links, 2013.

Yates, Donna, et al. Trafficking Culture: New Directions in Researching the Global Market in Illicit Antiquities. London: Routledge, 2019.

Online Resources:

Getting Started with Provenance ResearchArtwork Archive.

German Lost Art Foundation. Provenance Research Manual, To Identify Cultural Property Seized Due to Persecution During the National Social Era. (2019).

German Lost Art Foundation. Provenance Research Manual Annex. (2019).

Giovani, Angelina and Georgia Powell. “The Importance of Researching Works in Private Collections before and after Acquisition.” The Provenance Research Blog.

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. “Alfred Rosenberg and the ERR: The Records of Plunder and the Fate of Its Loot.” Reconstructing the Record of Nazi Cultural Plunder: A Guide to the Dispersed Archives of the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR) and the Postwar Retrieval of ERR Loot.“ August 2015.

Kaminker, Renata. “Conservation Treatments and Reports as an Integral Part of Provenance Research.The Provenance Research Blog.

McComas, Jennifer. “The German/American Provenance Research Exchange Program: An International Autobahn for Provenance Research.” Getty. (23 April 2018).

National Gallery of Art. World War II Provenance Research.

Network of European Restitution Committees on Nazi-Looted Art. Newsletter. 10 (June 2021).

Network of European Restitution Committees on Nazi-Looted Art. Newsletter. 9 (April 2021).

Network of European Restitution Committees on Nazi-Looted Art. Newsletter. 8 (January 2021).

Network of European Restitution Committees on Nazi-Looted Art. Newsletter. 7 (September 2020).

Network of European Restitution Committees on Nazi-Looted Art. Newsletter. 6 (May 2020).

Network of European Restitution Committees on Nazi-Looted Art. Newsletter. 5 (January 2020).

Network of European Restitution Committees on Nazi-Looted Art. Newsletter. 4 (September 2019).

Network of European Restitution Committees on Nazi-Looted Art. Newsletter. 3 (August 2019).

Network of European Restitution Committees on Nazi-Looted Art. Newsletter. 2 (June 2019).

Network of European Restitution Committees on Nazi-Looted Art. Newsletter. 1 (March 2019).

IFAR, International Foundation for Art Research. Provenance Guide.

Smithsonian. Smithsonian and Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation Announce German/American Provenance Research Exchange Program. (17 October 2016).

The Getty Research Institute. Using the Getty Provenance Index.

The Getty Research Institute. Collectors Files.

The Getty Research Institute. Sales Catalog Files.

TransCultAA – Transfer of Cultural Objects in the Alpe Adria Region in the 20th Century. [Humanities in the European Research Area]  

Australia:

Council of Australasian Museum Directors (CAMD), et al. Ethics and Provenance in Collections Acquisitions. Museums Australia Inc, 2014.

Austria:

Alker, Stefan. Bauer, Bruno and Markus Stumpf. NS-Provenienzforschung und Restitution an Bibliotheken. Berlin: de Gryyter Saur, 2016.

Anderl, Gabriele. Wesentlich Mehr Fälle Als Angenommen: 10 Jahre Kommission für Provenienzforschung.” Schriftenreihe der Kommission für Provenienzforschung 1. Wien: Böhlau, 2009.

Blimlinger, Eva, and Heinz Schodl. …(k)Ein Ende in Sicht: 20 Jahre Kunstrückgabegesetz in Österreich. Schriftenreihe der Kommission für Provenienzforschung 8. Wien: Böhlau, 2018.

— and Heinz Schödl. Die Praxis des Sammelns: Personen und Institutionen im Fokus der Provenienzforschung. Wien: Böhlau, 2014.

— and Monika Mayer. Kunst sammeln, Kunst handeln. Beiträge des Internationalen Symposiums in Wien. Schriftenreihe der Kommission für Provenienzforschung 3. Böhlau: Wien, 2012.

Czernin, Hubertus. Die Auslöschung: der Fall Thorsch. Vienna: Molden, 1998.

Dallinger, Petra-Maria and Georg Hofer. Logiken der Sammlung: Das Archiv zwischen Strategie und Eigendynamik. Boston: De Gruyter, 2020.

Duren, Justus. Die Bibliothek des „Sonderauftrags Münzen“. Erste Ergebnisse. Graz: Unipress Verlag, 2020.

Frank, Lisa and Regina Zodl. Das Exlibris Doris J. Klang als Beispiel eines bibliotheksübergreifenden Provenienzfalls. Graz: Unipress, 2020.

Gnann, Achim and Heinz Schödl. Spurensuche. Die Sammlung Arthur Feldmann und die Albertina. Schriftenreihe der Kommission für Provenienzforschung, special volume. Wien: Böhlau, 2015.

Gschiel, Christina. Nimeth, Ulrike und Leonhard Weidinger. schneidern und sammeln. Die Wiener Familie Rothberger. Schriftenreihe der Kommission für Provenienzforschung 2. Wien: Böhlau, 2010.

Hammer, Katharina. Splendor in the Dark: The Recovery of Art Treasures in Salzkammergut at the End of WWII. Wien: Österreichischer Bundesverlag, 1986.

Hehenberger, Susanne and Monika Löscher. Die verkaufte Malkunst. Jan Vermeers Gemälde im 20. Jahrhundert. Schriftenreihe der Kommission für Provenienzforschung 4. Wien: Böhlau, 2012.

Kostner, Christina. Künstliche Intelligenz in Bibliotheken: 34. Österreichischer Bibliothekartag Graz 2019. Graz: Unipress Verlag, 2019.

Kramar, Konrad. Wie die Bergleute von Altaussee Hitlers Raubkunst vor der Vernichtung retteten. Wien: Residenz Verlag, 2013.

Lillie, Sophie. Was einmal war: Handbuch der enteigneten Kunstsammlungen Wiens. Wien: Czernin, 2003.

—. Feindliche Gewalten. Das Ringen um Gustav Klimts Beethovenfries. Wien: Czernin, 2017.

Schölnberger, Pia. Loitfellner, Sabine. Bergung von Kulturgut im Nationalsozialismus. Mythen – Hintergründe – Auswirkungen. Schriftenreihe der Kommission für Provenienzforschung, Band 6. Wien: Böhlau, 2016.

Schoenberger, Sophie. Was heilt Kunst? Die späte Rückgabe von NS-Raubkunst als Mittel der Vergangenheitspolitik. Göttingen: Wallstein Verlag, 2019.

Schachl-Raber and Ursula Schmoller. Buchraub in Salzburg: Bibliotheks- und NS-Provenienzforschung an der Universitätsbibliothek Salzburg. Salzburg: Muery Salzmann, 2012.

Schölnberger, Pia and Sabine Loitfellner. Bergung von Kulturgut im Nationalsozialismus. Mythen – Hintergründe – Auswirkungen. Schriftenreihe der Kommission für Provenienzforschung 6. Wien: Böhlau, 2016.

Schwarz, Birgit. Hitlers Sonderauftrag Ostmark. Kunstraub und Museumspolitik im Nationalsozialismus. Schriftenreihe der Kommission für Provenienzforschung 7. Wien: Böhlau, 2018.

Shapreau, Carla. The Vienna Archives: Musical Expropriations During the Nazi Era and 21st Century Ramifications. Austrian Marhall Plan Foundation Report, 2014.

Stumpf, Markus and Jutta Fuchshuber. „Suizid-Bücher“ Provenienzforschung und bibliothekarische Erinnerungsarbeit. Graz: Unipress Verlag, 2020.

—. Guido Adlers Erbe: Restitution und Erinnerung an der Universität Wien. Göttingen: V & R Unipress, 2017.

Online Resources:

 “A landscape at Liechtensteinstraβe 45 in Vienna.” Network of European Restitution Committee on Nazi-Looted Art. 10 (June 2021): 9-10.  

“Search for heirs and art restitution with the aid of diplomacy: interministerial collaboration in Austrian art restitution.” Network of European Restitution Committee on Nazi-Looted Art. 10 (June 2021): 11-14.

“Case Study: Doris J. Klang.” Network of European Restitution Committee on Nazi-Looted Art. 10 (June 2021): 20-23.

Czech Republic:

Documentation Centre for Property Transfers of Cultural Assets of WWII Victims (ed.). Terezin Declaration – Ten Years Later. The documentation, identification and restitution of the cultural assets of WWII victims. Proceedings of an international academic conference held in Prague on 18 – 19 June 2019.

Documentation Centre for Property Transfers of the Cultural Assets of WW II victims (ed.) Židovský majetek uložený na zámku Sychrov II / umělecký průmysl. 2018.

Hopkinson, Christopher. Terezin Declaration- Ten Years Later: The Documentation, Identification and Restitution of the Cultural Assets of WWII Victims. Ministry of Culture of the Czech Republic, 2019

Museum of Decorative Arts, Prague. The Fate of Wartime Deposits. (2 volumes) Museum of Decorative Arts, Prague, 2021.

Belgium:

Online Resources:

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. “Belgium.” Reconstructing the Record of Nazi Cultural Plunder: A Guide to the Dispersed Archives of the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR) and the Postwar Retrieval of ERR Loot. “December 2016.

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. French and Belgian Jewish Art Collections Processed by the ERR in the Jeu de Paume, 1940–1944: Correlation Tables for Archival Sources.” Reconstructing the Record of Nazi Cultural Plunder: A Guide to the Dispersed Archives of the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR) and the Postwar Retrieval of ERR Loot.“ November 2019.

France:

Bouchoux, Corinna. “Si les tableaux pouvaient parler.” Le traitement politique et médiatique des retours d’œuvres d’art pillées et spoliées par les nazis. (France 1945-2008). Rennes: Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2013.

Dreyfus, Jean-Marc. L’Impossible Réparation. Déportés, biens spoliés, or nazi, comptes bloqués, criminels de guerre.Paris:Flammarion, 2015.

—. Le Catalogue Goering. Ministère des affaires étrangères. Archives diplomatiques. Paris: Flammarion, 2015.

—. “Le pillage des bibliothèques – et particulièrement des bibliothèques juives – en Alsace annexée, 1940-1945.” Saisies, spoliations, restitutions: Archives et bibliothèques au XXe siècle. Rennes: Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2012.

Grynberg, Anne and Johanna Linsler. L’Irréparable. Itinéraires d’artistes et d’amateurs d’art juifs, réfugiés du Troisième Reich en France. / Irreparabel. Lebenswege jüdischer Künstlerinnen, Künstler und Kunstkenner auf der Flucht aus dem „Dritten Reich“ in Frankreich. Veröffentlichungen der Koordinierungsstelle Magdeburg.  Vol. 9, Magdeburg 2012.

Hand, Séan. Katz, Steven (ed.) Post-Holocaust France and the Jews, 1945-1955. New York: NYU Press, 2015.

Interim Report. Paris: Commission for the Study of the Spoilation of Jews in France: April-December 1997, 31 December 1997.

Le Masne de Chermont, Isabelle and Laurence Sigal-Klagsbald. Looking for Owners: French Policy for Provenance Research, Restitution and Custody of Art Stolen in France during World War Two. Paris: Réunion des Musées Nationaux, 2008.

Leff, Lisa Moses. The Archive Thief: The Man Who Salvaged French Jewish History in the Wake of the Holocaust. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015.

McAuley, James. The House of Fragile Things. Jewish Art Collectors and the Fall of France. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2021.

Poulain, Martine. “Les spoliations des bibliothèques privées par les nazis en France: des milliers de personnes victims d’un vol de masse.” Alexandre Sumpf and Vincent Laniol (ed.). Saisies, spoliations et logiques de restitution. Archives et bibliothèques au XXe siècle (Actes du colloque international, Strasbourg, 22-23 octobre 2010). Rennes: Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2012, pp. 229–240.

Répertoire des Biens Spoliés en France Durant la Guerre, 1939-1945. Groupe Francais du Conseil de Controle. Division des Reparations et Restitutions. Paris, 1947.

Simon, Matila. The Battle of the Louvre: The Struggle to Save French Art in World War II. New York: Hawthorn Books, 1971.

Skilton, John. Défense de l’art européen: souvenirs d’un officier americain specialiste des monuments. Paris: Editions Internationales, 1948.

The Jeu de Paume and the Looting of France. New York: Cultural Property Research Foundation, 1998.

Valland, Rose. Le Front de l’art: défense des collections françaises. Paris: Plon, 1961.

Online Resources:

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. “France.” Reconstructing the Record of Nazi Cultural Plunder: A Guide to the Dispersed Archives of the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR) and the Postwar Retrieval of ERR Loot.“ June 2017.

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. French and Belgian Jewish Art Collections Processed by the ERR in the Jeu de Paume, 1940–1944: Correlation Tables for Archival Sources.” Reconstructing the Record of Nazi Cultural Plunder: A Guide to the Dispersed Archives of the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR) and the Postwar Retrieval of ERR Loot.“ November 2019.

Three artworks from the national collections lost during World War II have been returned to France.” Network of European Restitution Committee on Nazi-Looted Art. 10 (2021): 15.

Berlin returns to the French Ministry of the Armed Forces a book looted during the Occupation.” Network of European Restitution Committee on Nazi-Looted Art. 10 (2021): 19.

Return of 12 works to the heirs of Armand Dorville.” Network of European Restitution Committee on Nazi-Looted Art. 10 (2021): 16-18.

Germany:

Baensch, Tanja. Kratz-Kessemeier, Kristina and Dorothee Wimmer (ed,). Museen im Nationalsozialismus. Akteure – Orte – Politik. Wien: Böhlau, 2016.

Baresel-Brand, Andrea. Bahrmann, Nadine and Gilbert Lupfer. Kunstfund Gurlitt. Wege der Forschung. Provenire 2. Berlin: de Gruyter, 2020.

—. Verantwortung Wahrnehmen: NS-Raubkunst – Eine Herausforderung an Museen, Bibliotheken und Archive. Magdeburg: Koordinierungsstelle für Kulturgutverluste, 2009.

— and Ulf Häder. Museen im Zwielicht. Ankaufspolitik 1933-1945. Kollloquium vom 11. und 12. Dezember 2001 in Köln. Veröffentlichungen der Koordiniersungsstelle für Kulturgutverluste. Vol. 2. Magdeburg: Koordinierungsstelle für Kulturgutverluste, 2006.

—. Die eigene Geschichte. Provenienzforschung an Deutschen Kunstmuseen im Internationalen Vergleich. Tagung vom 20. bis 22. Februar 2002 in Hamburg. Koordinierungsstelle für Kulturgutverluste. Vol. 2. Magdeburg: Koordinierungsstelle für Kulturgutverluste, 2006.

Bähr, Astrid and Joachim Brand. German Sales 1930-1945. Bibliographie der Auktionskataloge aus Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz.  Kunstbibliothek Berlin, 2013.

Bernsau, Tanja. Die Besatzer als Kuratoren? Der Central Collecting Point Wiesbaden als Drehscheibe für einen Wiederaufbau der Museumslandschaft nach 1945. Berlin: LIT Verlag, 2013.

Bomski, Franziska. Seemann, Hellmut Th. and Thorsten Valk (eds.). Spuren Suchen. Provenienzforschung in Weimar. Jahrbuch der Klassik Stiftung Weimar. Göttingen: Wallstein, 2018.

Eckert, Astrid. The Struggle for the Files: The Western Allies and the Return of German Archives after the Second World War. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014.

Emmert, Claudia. Neddermeyer, Ina. Niehoff, Mark, and Zeppelin-Museum. Eigentum Verpflichtet: Eine Kunstsammlung auf dem Prüfstand. Berlin: Neofelis, 2020.

Felbinger, Udo. Herkunft Unbekannt?: Provenienzforschung in Der Sammlung Lemmers-Danforth. Petersburg: Michael Imhof Verlag, 2020.

Finger, Jürgen and Sven Keller. Wirsching, Andreas. Dr. Oetker und der Nationalsozialismus – Geschichte eines Familienunternehmens 1933-1945. Munich: C.H. Beck, 2013.

Fuhrmeister, Christian. Kunsthistoriker im Krieg. Deutscher Militärischer Kunstschutz in Italien 1943-1945. Köln: Böhlau, 2012.

—. “Führerauftrag Monumentalmalerei.” Eine Fotokampagne 1943-1945. Köln: Böhlau, 2006.

Gallas, Elisabeth. Das Leichenhaus der Bücher. Kulturrestitution und jüdisches Geschichtsdenken nach 1945. Schriftenreihe des Simon-Dubnow-Instituts. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2013.

Gay, Peter. Weimar culture. New York: Harper Torchbooks, 1970. 

Goldmann, Renate. Unsere Werte? Provenienzforschung im Dialog: Leopold-Hoesch-Museum Düren und Wallraf-Richartz-Museum Köln. Düren: Wienand Verlag, 2017.

Goschler, Constantin. Wiedergutmachung: Westdeutschland und die Verfolgten der Nationalsozialismus 1945 – 1954. Munich: Oldenbourg, 1992.

Grabowski, Jörn und Petra Winter (ed.) Zwischen Politik und Kunst: Die Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin in der Zeit des Nationalsozialismus. Köln: Böhlau, 2013.

Gramlich, Johannes. Begehrt, beschwiegen, belastend: Die Kunst der NS-Elite, die Alliierten und die Bayerischen Staatsgemäldesammlungen. Göttingen: Böhlau, 2021.

Greenfield, Jeannette. The Return of Cultural Treasures. 2d ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Hauschke-Wicklaus, Gabriele. Amborn-Morgenstern, Angelika and Erika Jacobs. Fast vergessen: Das amerikanische Bücherdepot in Offenbach am Main von 1945 bis 1949. Offenbach am Main: Geschichtswerkstatt Offenbach, 2011.

Heil, Johannes und Annette Weber (ed.) Ersessene Kunst – Der Fall Gurlitt. Berlin: Metropol Verlag, Juni 2015.

Hickley, Catherine. The Munich Art Hoard: Hitler’s Dealer and His Secret Legacy. London: Thames and Hudson, 2015.

Hoffmann, Meike. Kuhn, Nicola. Hitlers Kunsthändler. Hildebrand Gurlitt 1895–1956. München: C.H. Beck, 2016.

Hopp, Meike. “‘Ist Moderne Kunst noch ein Spekulationsobjekt?’ Das Gesetz über das Versteigerergewerbe und die Regulierung des Auktionswesens durch die Reichskammer der bildenden Künste”. Tiedermann, Anja (ed.) Die Kammer schreibt schon wieder. Das Reglement für den Handel mit Moderner Kunst im Nationalsozialismus. (Schriften der Forschungsstelle “Entartete Kunst”, Bd. 10). Berlin: Walter De Gruyter, 2016 pp. 49-68.

Kenzler, Marcus. Herkunft Verpflichtet! Die Geschichte hinter den Werken: 101 Schlagworte zur Provenienzforschung. Landesmuseum für Kunst und Kulturgeschichte Oldenburg. Oldenburg: Isensee Verlag, 2017.

Kenzler, Marcus. Herkunft verpflichtet! die Geschichte hinter den Werken: 101 Schlagworte zur Provenienzforschung. Oldenburg: Isensee, 2017.

Kogelfranz, Siegfried and Willi A. Korte. Quedlingburg – Texas und zurück. Unich: Droemer Knaur, 1994.

Koldehoff, Stefan. Die Bilder sind unter uns. Das Geschäft mit der NS-Raubkunst. Frankfurt: Eichhorn Verlag, 2009.

Knyschewskij, Pawel Nikolawitsch. Moskaus Beute. Wie Vermögen, Kulturgüter und Intelligenz nach 1945 aus Deutschland geraubt wurden. München: Landsberg am Lech, 1995.

Lauterbach, Iris.  Der Central Collecting Point in München. Kunstschutz, Restitution, Neubeginn. München/Berlin: Deutscher Kunstverlag 2015. (Veröffentlichungen des Zentralinstituts für Kunstgeschichte in München, 34)

—. Steinle, Piero. Rosefeldt, Julian. Bürokratie und Kult. Das Parteizentrum der NSDAP am Königsplatz in München. München/Berlin: Deutscher Kunstverlag 1995. (Veröffentlichungen des Zentralinstituts für Kunstgeschichte in München, X)

—. “„Arche Noah“, „Museum ohne Besucher“? Der Central Art Collecting Point in München.” Baresel-Brand, Andrea (ed.) Entehrt, Ausgeplündert, Arisiert. Entrechtung und Enteignung der Juden. Magdeburg: Coordination Office for Lost Cultural Assets, 2005, pp. 335–352.

Pomrenze, Seymour J.  Personal Reminiscences of the Offenbach Archival Depot, 1946-49: Fulfilling International and Moral Obligations. Washington: U.S. Holocaust Museum, 1998.

Remy, Maurice Philip. Der Fall Gurlitt: Die wahre Geschichte über Deutschlands größten Kunstskandal. Munich: Europa Verlag, 2017.

Rader, Henning and Vanessa-Maria Voigt. “Ehem. Jüdischer Besitz:” Erwerbungen des Münchner Stadtmuseums im Nationalsozialismus. Munich: Hirmer, 2018.

Rother, Lynn. Kunst durch Kredit. Die Berliner Museen und Ihre Erwerbungen von der Dresdner Bank 1935. Berlin: De Gruyter, 2017.

Schleusener, Jan. Raub von Kulturgut. Der Zugriff des NS-Staats auf jüdischen Kunstbesitz in München und seine Nachgeschichte. Kooperationsprojekt der staatlichen und städtischen Museen Münchens mit der Universität Erfurt (Lehrstuhl für Zeitgeschichte). Bayerische Studien zur Museumsgeschichte Band 3. München/Berlin: Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2016.

Schnabel, Gunnar and Monika Tatzkow. The Story of Street Scene: Restitution on Nazi Looted Art: Case and Controversy. Berlin: Proprietas, 2008.

Schulze, Sabine and Silke Reuther. Raubkunst? Provenienzforschung zu den Sammlungen des Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg. Hamburg: Museum Fur Kunst und Gewerbe, 2014.

Schwartz, Johannes and Simone Vogt. Spuren der NS-Verfolgung: Provenienzforschung in den Kulturhistorischen Sammlungen der Stadt Hannover. Köln: Wienand, 2019.

Sepp, Theresa. Ernst Buchner (1892-1962): Meister der Adaption von Kunst und PolitikDissertation: Ludwig‐Maximilians‐Universität München, 2021.

Siviero, Rodolfo. Second National Exhibition of the Works of Art Recovered in Germany. Florence: Sansoni, 1950.

Stäbler, Wolfgang. Kulturgutverluste, Provenienzforschung Restitution: Sammlungsgut mit belasteter Herkunft in Museen, Bibliotheken und Archiven. Museums Bausteine, vol. 10. Munich: Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2007.

Strelow, Irena. NS-Raubkunst in deutschen Museen. Studien zur Provenienzforschung, vol.3. Berlin: Hentrich & Hentrich Verlag, 2018.

—. Strelow, Irena. “Ich werde aber weiter sorgen“: NS-Raubkunst in katholischen Kirchen. Studien zur Provenienzforschung, vol. 2. Berlin: Hentrich & Hentrich, 2017.

Strobl, Andreas, et al. Rudolf Von Alt: … Genial, Lebhaft, natürlich Und Wahr : Der Münchner Bestand Und Seine Provenienz. Staatliche Graphische Sammlung München. Berlin: Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2015.

Vogel, Barbara (ed.) Restitution von NS-Raubkunst. Der historisch begründete. Anspruch auf eine Rechtslage. Essen: Klartext, 2016.

Wirth, Gunther. Verbotene Kunst, 1933-1945: verfolgte Künstler im deutschen Südwestern. Stuttgart: Hatje, 1987.

Online Resources:

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. “Germany.” Reconstructing the Record of Nazi Cultural Plunder: A Guide to the Dispersed Archives of the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR) and the Postwar Retrieval of ERR Loot. Chapter 3: Germany. December 2019.

Jobstl, Birgit. “Provenienzforschung: Nancy Karrels und die Rückseiten der Gemälde.” Blog Der Staatlichen Museen Zu Berlin (12 September 2017).

Jobstl, Birgit. “‘Warum dauert das denn so Lange?’ – Provenienzforschung im Kupferstichkabinett.” Blog der Staatlichen Museen Zu Berlin (5 September 2017).

Lange, Carolin. “Provenance Research Explained – Office for Non-State Museums in Bavaria.” German Lost Art Foundation (September 2017).

Loffler, Emily. “Provenance Research Explained – An Interview with the Landesmuseum Mainz.” German Lost Art Foundation (November 2017).

Pecia, Kristina and Marlies Coburger. “Provenance Research Explained – An Interview with Müllrose Museum of Local History.German Lost Art Foundation. (August 2017).

Provenienzforschung: Detektive des Museums.Blog der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin. (20 October 2016).

Stienen, Sven. “Was Macht Eigentlich …” Blog Der Staatlichen Museen Zu Berlin. (2018).

Hungary:

Mravik, László (ed.). The “Sacco Di Budapest” and Depredation of Hungary, 1938-1949: Works of Art Missing from Hungary as a Result of the Second World War: Looted, Smuggled, Captured, Lost and Destroyed Art Works, Books, and Archival Documents: Preliminary and Provisional Catalog. Budapest: Hungarian National Gallery for the Joint Restitution Committee at the Hungarian Ministry of Culture and Education, 1998.

Israel:

Amit, Gish. Ex Libris: Chronicles of Theft, Preservation, and Appropriating at the Jewish National Library.” The Van Leer Jerusalem Institute and Hakibbutz Hameuchad, 2014. (in Hebrew)

Levin, Itamar. The Last Chapter of the Holocaust? The Struggle over the Restitution of Jewish Property in Europe. Revised ed. Jewish Agency for Israel and the World Jewish Restitution Organization, 1998.

Online Resources:

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. “Israel.” Reconstructing the Record of Nazi Cultural Plunder: A Guide to the Dispersed Archives of the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR) and the Postwar Retrieval of ERR Loot. “ December 2015.

Italy:

Morozzi, Luisa, and Rita Paris (eds.). Treasures Untraced: An Inventory of the Italian Art Lost During the Second World War. Rome: Istituto poligrafico e Zecca dello Stato, 1995.

Siviero, Rodolfo. Arte e Nazismo: esodo e ritorno delle opera d’arte italiano 1938-1963.  Florence: Cantini, 1984.

Watson, Peter. Todeschini, Cecilia. The Medici Conspiracy:  The Illicit Journey of Looted Antiquities From

Italy’s Tomb Raiders to the World’s Greatest Museums.  New York: PublicAffairs, 2007.

Netherlands:

Barend, Veen. Herkomstenonderzoek Van De Douglas in Nederland. Wageningen: Excelsiors Foto-Offset, 1951.

Campfens, Evelien (ed.). Fair and Just Solutions?” Alternatives to litigation in Nazi-looted art disputes: status quo and new developments. Restitutie Commissie. The Hague: Eleven International Publication, 2015.

Hopmans, Anita. Verwerving En Restitutie: De Zaaks Toorop. Rotterdam: Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, 2008.

Langfeld, Gregor. Soeting, Margreeth and Margriet Schavemaker. The Museum and the Second World War.”  Amsterdam: Bas Lubberhuizen, 2015. (Exhibition Catalogue: http://www.stedelijk.nl/en/exhibitions/the-stedelijk-museum-the-second-world-war)

La Farge, Henry. Lost Treasures of Europe: 427 Photographs. New York: Pantheon, 1946.

Smyth, Craig Hugh. Repatriation of art from the collecting point in Munich after World War II: background and beginnings, with reference especially to the Netherlands. The Hague: SDU, 1988.

Tan, Fiona. Provenance. Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum, 2008.

Online Resources:

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. “The Netherlands.” Reconstructing the Record of Nazi Cultural Plunder: A Guide to the Dispersed Archives of the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR) and the Postwar Retrieval of ERR Loot.“ October 2015.

Interview with the Dutch Minister of Education, Culture and Science.” Network of European Restitution Committees on Nazi-Looted Art. Newsletter. 10 (June 2021).

Poland:

Estreicher, Charles, ed. Cultural Losses of Poland: Index of Polish Cultural Losses during the German Occupation. London: n.p., 1944.

Kowalski, Wojciech. Liquidation of the Effects of World War II in the Area of Culture. Warsaw: Institute of Culture, 1994.

—. Kuhnke, Monika. Wrobel, Justyna. Raub und Restitution. Aktivitäten des polnischen Ministeriums für Auswärtige Angelegenheiten im Bereich der Rückgabe der von Polen im Zweiten Weltkrieg verlorenen Kulturgüter.  Edited and published by the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 2016.

Lewandowska, Anne. The Basics of Conducting Provenance Research. Warsaw: National Institute for Museums and Public Collections, 2017.

Pidlypczak-Majerowicz, Maria. Badania Proweniencyjne w Bibliotekach Kościelnych. Federacja Bibliotek Kościelnych Fides, 2014.

Tomkiewicz, Wladyslaw. Catalogue of paintings moved from Poland by the German occupation authorities during the years 1939-1945. I. Foreign paintings. Publications of the Reparations Section, No. 9. Warsaw: Ministry of Culture and Art, 1950.

Tyczyńska, Anna and Krystyna Znojewska (ed.). Straty wojenne, malarstwo polskie, obrazy olejne, pastele, akwarele utracone w latach 1939-1945 w granicach Polski po 1945. Poznań: Ministerstwo Kultury i Sztuki, Biuro Pełnomocnika Rządu do Spraw Polskiego Dziedzictwa Kulturalnego za Granicą, 1998.

Zeidler, Kamil. Restitution of Cultural Property: A hard case, theory of argumentation, philosophy of law. Gdańsk: Gdańsk University Press, 2016.

Russian Federation:

Akinsha, Konstantin. Beautiful Loot: The Soviet Plunder of Europe’s Art Treasures. New York: Random House, 1995.

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. Hoogewoud, F.J. and Eric Ketelaar (eds). Returned from Russia: Nazi Archival Plunder in Western Europe and Recent Restitution Issues. United Kingdom: Institute for Art and Law, 2007. 

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. Trophies of War and Empire: The Archival Heritage of the Ukraine, World War II, and the International Politics of Restitution. Cambridge: Harvard Papers in Ukrainian Studies, 2001.

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. U.S. Restitution of Nazi-Looted Cultural Treasures to the USSR, 1945-1959: Facsimile Documents from the National Archives of the United States. CD-ROM edition. (Washington, DC: GPO, 2001).

Ilatovskaya, Tatiana. Master Drawings Rediscovered Treasures from Prewar German Collections. New York: Ministry of Culture of the Russian Federation and State Hermitage Museum in association with Harry N. Abrams, 1996. (Catalog of the exhibition held at the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, December 3 – March 31, 1997).

Slovenia:

Premk, Janez. Hudelja, Michaela. Tracing Jewish Heritage: A Guidebook to Slovenia. Ljubljana: JAS Research and Documentation Center, 2014.

Switzerland:

Buomberger, Thomas and Guido Magnaguagno. Schwarzbuch Bührle. Raubkunst für das Kunsthaus Zürich? Zürich: Rotpunktverlag, 2015.

Lange, Carolin and Thomas Schmutz. Provenienzforschung im Museum I. NS-Raubgut, Grundlagen und Einführung in die Praxis. Zürich: Verband der Museen Schweiz, 2021.

Renold, Marc-André and Pierre Gabus (ed.). Claims for the Restitution of Looted Art. Zürich: Schulthess, 2004.

United Kingdom:

Bartoli, Antonia. “Findings from the Bindings: An Overview of Nazi-Era Spoliation Research at the British Library.” Köstner, Christina. Stadler, Elisabeth and Markus Stumpf. Künstliche Intelligenz in Bibliotheken: 34. Österreichischer Bibliothekartag Graz 2019, Graz: Unipress Verlag, 2020.

Woolley, Charles Leonard. A Record of the Work Done by the Military Authorities for the Protection of the Treasures of Art and History in War Areas. London: HMSO, 1947.

Online Resources:

Thinking Provenance, Thinking Restitution.” Network of European Restitution Committee on Nazi-Looted Art. 10 (June 2021): 9-10.

Why comparing with others can be a good thing.” Network of European Restitution Committee on Nazi-Looted Art. 10 (June 2021): 9-10.

United States:

Bell, Jonathan and Kristi Nelson. The Berlin Masterpieces in America: Paintings, Politics, and the Monuments Men. In association with Cincinnati Art Museum. London: Giles, 2020.

Bradsher, Greg. Holocaust Era Assets: A Finding Aid to Records at the National Archives at College Park. Maryland: National Archives and Records Administration, 1999.

Buck, Rebecca and Jean Allman Gilmore. The New Museum Registration Methods. Washington: AAM Press, American Association of Museums, 2010.

Congress. Senate. Committee on Armed Services. Temporary retention in the U.S. of certain German paintings. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1948. (80th Cong. 2nd sess., S. Hrg., March 4 and April 16, 1948).

Edsel, Robert M.  Rescuing da Vinci: Hitler and the Nazis Stole Europe’s Great Art, America and Her Allies Recovered It. Dallas: Laurel Publishers, 2006.

Feigenbaum, Gail and Inge Reist. Provenance: An Alternate History of Art. Getty Publications, 2013.

Harrison, Nancy. Appraising Art: The Definitive Guide to Appraising the Fine and Decorative Arts. New York: Appraisers Association of America. 2013.

Hay, Bruce L. Nazi-Looted Art and the Law: the American cases. Springer International PU, 2018.

International Provenance Research Colloquium. Vitalizing Memory: International Perspectives on Provenance Research. Washington, DC: American Association of Museums, 2005. 

Kurtz, Michael J.  America and the Return of Nazi Contraband: The Recovery of Europe’s Cultural Treasures. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.

—.  Nazi Contraband: American Policy on the Return of European Cultural Treasures, 1945-1955. New York: Garland, 1985.

Leab, Daniel J. The Auction Companion. New York: Harper & Row, 1981.

Malaro, Marie.  A Legal Primer on Managing Museum Collections. Washington: Smithsonian Books, 2012.

Milosch, Jane, et al. Collections: a Journal for Museum and Archives Professionals: Focus Issue: Provenance Research in American Institutions. Lanham: AltaMira Press, 2014.

Wechsler, Helen. Coate-Saal, Teri and John Lukavic. Museum Policy and Procedures for Nazi-Era Issues. Washington. Washington DC: American Association of Museums, 2001.

Weil, Stephen E. Making Museums Matter. New York: Random House, 2012.

Yeide, Nancy H., Konstantin Akinsha, and Amy L. Walsh. The AAM Guide to Provenance Research. Washington, DC: American Association of Museums, 2001.

Online Resources:

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. “United States of America.” Reconstructing the Record of Nazi Cultural Plunder: A Guide to the Dispersed Archives of the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR) and the Postwar Retrieval of ERR Loot.“ March 2015.

Nazi-Era Provenance Internet Portal (About the Portal).” American Alliance of Museums.

 “Researching the Provenance of a Work of Art.” The Art Institute of Chicago.

Organizations:

ICOM. Cent Objets Disparus: One Hundred Missing Objects. Paris, 2001.

IFAR (International Foundation for Art Research). Provenance Guide, updated version May 2017.

Järvinen. Markkhu. Convention of the Hague of 1954 by UNESCO for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict. n.p.: International Council on Archives, 1995. 9 pp. (Presentation at XXXIst International Conference of the Round Table on Archives, “War, Archives, and the Comity of Nations, 1st working session, “Protection of Records During War”, Washington, 6-9 September 1995).

On the dispersal of Judaica:

Herman, Dana. Hashavat Avedah: A History of Jewish Cultural Reconstruction, Inc. (Ph.D. diss., McGill University, 2008).

Cohen, Julie-Marthe with Felicitas Heimann-Jelinek (eds.), Neglected Witnesses. The Fate of Judaica Collections during World War II.  Nr Builth Wells: Crickadarn 2011.

— and Ruth Jolanda Weinberger. Handbook on Judaica Provenance Research: Ceremonial Objects. Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, 2019. [German edition: https://art.claimscon.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Judaica-Handbook-DE_17-Sep-2019.pdf]

Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany. Descriptive Catalogue of Looted Judaica (created 2009 and partially updated in 2016).

Fishman, David E., Kupovetsky, Mark and Vladimir Kuzelenkov. Nazi-looted Jewish Archives in Moscow: A Guide to Jewish Historical and Cultural Collections in the Russian State Military Archive. Scranton: University of Scranton Press, 2011.


ARTICLES:
General:

Baker, Kenneth. “A nightmare of an exhibition that really happened.” Smithsonian. 22. 4 (July 1991): 86-95.

Barr, Alfred. “Art in the Third Reich – Preview 1933.” Magazine of Art. 38. 6 (October 1945): 212-222.

Barron, Stephanie. “The Gallery Fischer Auction.” “Degenerate art”: the fate of the Avante-Garde in Nazi Germany. Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) and Abrams. (1991): 135-169.

Bittman, Alexander. “Spoils of war.” History Today. 49.1 (January 1999): 3.

Bloedow, Edmund. “The authenticity and integrity of ‘Priam’s Treasure’.” Boreas. 14-15 (1991-1992).

Breslau, Karen. “The heist of 1945: the looted treasures of Europe may at last be returned to their owners.” Newsweek. 118.3 (15 July 1991): 51+.

Busterud, John A. “The treasure in the salt mine.” Army – Arlington (Association of the United States Army) 47.3 (March 1997): 47-51.

Church, Judith. “Evolving U.S. Case Law on Cultural Property Disputes.” International Journal of Cultural Property. 1.2 (1993): pp. 47-71.

Decker, Andrew. “An untapped, if forbidden, source.” ARTnews. 91.7 (September 1992): 36+.

—. Akinsha, Konstantin. “A worldwide treasure hunt.” ARTnews. 90.6 (Summer 1991): 130-138.

Decker, Andrew. “Nazi art returns to Germany”. ARTnews. 83.9 (November 1984): 143, 145.

Decker, Andrew and Mariana Schroeder. “Blocking the black market.” ARTnews. 94.4 (April 1995): 46.

Deme, Katalin.  “From Restored Past to Unsettled Present: New Challenges for Jewish Museums in East Central Europe.” East European Jewish Affairs. 45.2-3 (2015): 252–260.

Deshmukh, Marion. “Recovering culture: the Berlin National Gallery and the U.S. occupation 1945-1949.” Central European History. 27 (1994): 411-439.

Dowd, Raymond. “Nazi Looted Art and Cocaine: When Museum Directors Take It, Call the Cops.” Rutgers Journal of Law and Religion. 14 (May 2013).

Duboff, Leonard D. and Mary Ann Crawford Duboff. “The protection of artistic national patrimony against pillaging and theft in law and the visual arts”. Law and the Visual Arts Conference. Portland, OR: Northwestern School of Law, 1974.

Eichwede, Wolfgang. “Models of restitution (Germany, Russia, Ukraine)”.  The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property, 216-220. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1997. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January, 1995).

Esterow, Milton. “A heavenly treasure”. The art stealers. (1973): 78-99.

Felcher, Anastasia. “Reportage: Small exhibits, major steps: four post-Soviet Jewish museums”. East European Jewish Affairs. 45. 2–3 (2015): 312–320.

Fieldler, Wilfried. “Safeguarding of cultural property during occupation – modifications of the Hague Convention of 1907 by World War II”. Fifth Colloquium on the Legal Aspects of International Trade in Art: Licit Trade in Works of Art. Paris: International Chamber of Commerce, Check status. (Colloquium, Vienna, September 28-30, 1994).

Flanner, Janet. “The Beautiful Spoils”. Men & monuments: profiles of Picasso, Matisse, Braque, & Malraux. (1990).

Fox, Mira. “Nazis stole thousands of pieces of art — but that was only the beginning of the story.” The Forward. (19 August 2021)

Fuhrmeister, Christian and Meike Hopp. “Rethinking Provenance Research.” Getty Research Journal. 11 (2019): 213-231.

Gallas, Elisabeth.  “Kulturelles Erbe und rechtliche Anerkennung. Die Jewish Cultural Reconstruction, Inc. nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg“. Jahrbuch für Antisemitismusforschung. 22 (2013).

—. “Locating the Jewish Future: The Restoration of Looted Cultural Property in Early Postwar Europe” Naharaim. 9.1-2 (2015): 25-47.

Ganslmayr, H. “Study on the principles, conditions and means for the restitution or return of cultural property in view of reconstituting dispersed heritages”. Museum. 31.1 (1979).

Greenfield, Jeannette. “The Spoils of War”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 34-38. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January, 1995).

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. “Beyond Cold War Over a Restitution Claim?” Art Antiquity and Law. XVIII.4 (December 2013).

Hall, Ardelia R. “The recovery of cultural objects dispersed during World War II”. Department of State Bulletin. 25. 635 (27 August 1951): 337-340, 344-345.

Hoffman, Barbara. “The spoils of war.” Archaeology (November-December 1993): 37-40.

Honan, William H. “Journalist on the chase”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 153-155. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Huyssen, Andreas. Rabinbach, Anson. Shalem, Avinoam.  “Nazi-Looted Art and Its Legacies: Introduction“.  New German Critique. 44 (2017): 1-7.

Hamlin, Gladys E. “European art collections and the war.” College Art Journal. 4 (May 1946): 219-228.

Hammett, Ralph. “ComZone and the protection of monuments in Northwest Europe.” College Art Journal. 5 (January 1946): 123-126.

Hamon, Marie. “’The Working Group on Cultural Property’. Cultural treasures moved because of the war: a cultural legacy of the Second World war: documentation and research on losses.” (1995): 43-63. (Documentation of the International Meeting in Bremen, 30 November to 2 December 1994).

Henry-Künzel, Ginger and Andrew Decker. “Never look a gift horse in the mouth”. ARTnews. 93.4 (April 1994): 51-52.

Jolis, Alan. “War loot goes on-line”. ARTnews. 95.8 (September 1996): 58.

Kahn, Eve M. “The Man Who Stole Nazi-Era History From the Streets.” New York Times (11 June 2015).

Kaufman, Joshua and Jeff Kleinman. “Society to prevent trade in stolen art.” Spoils of War. 2 (July 1996): 11-12.

Kaye, Lawrence M. “The statute of limitations in art recovery cases: an overview”. IFAR Journal (International Foundation for Art Research) 1.3 (Autumn 1998): 22-28.

—. “Laws in force at the dawn of World War II: international conventions and national laws”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 100-105. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Kirstein, Lincoln. “Art in the Third Reich – survey.” Magazine of Art. 38.6 (October 1945): 223-242.

Korfmann, Manfred. “The value of the finds to the scientific community.” The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 207-211. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Korte, Willi. “Trans-Art.” Spoils of War. 0 (1995): 5-7.

—. “Search for the treasures.” The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 150-152. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Kowalski, Wojciech. “Introduction to International Law of Restitution of Works of Art looted during armed conflicts. Part I”. Spoils of War. 2 (July 1996): 6-8.

—. “Introduction to International Law of Restitution of Works of Art Looted during Armed Conflicts. Part II.” Spoils of War. 3 (December 1996): 10-11.

—-. “Introduction to International Law of Restitution of Works of Art looted during armed conflicts. Part III.” Spoils of War. 4 (August 1977): 39-41.

—. “Introduction to International Law of Restitution of Works of Art looted during armed conflicts. Part IV”. Spoils of War. 5 (June 1998): 7-9.

Lambsdorff, Hagen Graf. “Return of cultural property: hostages of war or harbingers of peace? Historical facts, political positions, and an assessment from the German point of view.” The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 241-243. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Lauria, Joe. “An amicable resolution.” ARTnews. 97.9 (October 1998): 54.

LeBor, Adam. “The last Nazi art scandal.” Independent (18 November 1998).

Levin, Zeev. “Reportage: The Bukharan-Jewish Museum in Samarkand: memory preservation of a rapidly-diminishing community.” East European Jewish Affairs. 45. 2–3 (2015): 305–311.

Mann, Vivian B. “Jewish ceremonial art and private property.” The spoils of war – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 84-87. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Merryman, John Henry. “The protection of artistic national patrimony against pillaging and theft.” Law and the Visual Arts. (1974): 153-172.

Morey, Charles R. “What we are actually doing to save Europe’s art.” ARTnews. 43 (15-31 May 1944): 9-10, 24-25.

—. “The war and mediaeval art”. College Art Journal. 4. 2 (January 1945): 75-80. (Paper presented at the Archaeological Institute of America’s Symposium, “Europe’s Monuments as Affected by the War,” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, December 28, 1944).

Morris, Collin R. “The law and stolen art, artificacts, and antiquities”. Howard Law Review. 36.1 (1993): 201-226.

“Museums adopt Holocaust-Era art restitution guidelines”. IFAR Journal (International Foundation for Art Research). 1.3 (Autumn 1998): 20-21.

Nicholas, Lynn H. “World War II and the displacement of art and cultural property”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 39-48. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Nowikowski, Frank. “The tangled web of art’s war victims.” History Today. 44. 5 (May 1994): 3+.

Opper, Dieter, Jost Hansen and Doris Lemmermeier, eds. “Cultural treasures moved because of the war: a cultural legacy of the Second World war: documentation and research on losses”. (1995): 189+. (Documentation of the International Meeting in Bremen, 30 November to 2 December 1994).

Palmer, Norman. “Museums and the Holocaust: the Futility of Litigation.” Art, Antiquity and Law. 5.3 (2000): 233-250.

Pearson, David. “Exploring and Recording Provenance: Initiatives and Possibilities.” The University of Chicago Press Journals. (December 1997): 505–515.

Petropoulos, Jonathan. “Not a case of “art for art’s sake”: the collecting practices of the Nazi elite.” German Politics and Society.  32 (Summer 1994): 107-124.

—. “The importance of the second rank: the case of the art plunderer Kajetan Mühlmann.” Contemporary Austrian Studies. 4. (1996): 177-221.

—. “German laws and directives bearing on the appropriation of cultural property in the Third Reich.”  The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 106-111. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

—. “Saving culture from the Nazis”. Harvard Magazine. 92.4 (March-April 1990): 34-42.

—. “Exposing ‘deep files’.” ARTnews. 98.1 (January 1999): 143-144.

Plagens, Peter. “The spoils of war: pictures looted by Nazis hang in top museums.” Newsweek. 131.13 (30 March 1998): 60+.

Plaut, James S. “Loot for the master race.“ Atlantic Monthly. 178.9 (September 1946): 57-63.

—. “Investigation of the major Nazi art-confiscation agencies.” The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 124-125. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

—. “Hitler’s capital.“ Atlantic Monthly. 178 (October 1946): 57-63.

“The plunder of art treasures.” Nazi conspiracy and aggression. 1 (1946): 1097-1116. (Washington: GPO for the International Military Tribunal, Nurnberg, Germany, Office of the U.S. Chief of Counsel for the Prosecution of Axis Criminality.)

Posey, Robert K. “Protection of cultural materials during combat.” College Art Journal. 5.2 (January 1946): 127-131.

Prott, Lyndel V. and Jan Hladik. “The role of UNESCO ‘Intergovernmental Committee for Promoting the Return of Cultural Property’ in the resolution of disputes concerning cultural property removed in consequence of the Second World War.” Spoils of War.  4 (August 1977): 59-61.

Puloy, Monika. “Imperialists, dictators and supermuseums.” Issues. 4.2 (1996): 104-116.

Rastorgouev, Alexei. “Displaced art in private hands.” The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 166-170. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

“Recovery of lost European treasures”. The Record (Department of State). 7. 3 (May-June 1951): 39-42.

Rigby, Douglas and Elizabeth Rigby. “Embattled collectors: how treasures of art and culture flee from war.” Harper’s Magazine. 182 (January 1941): 200-208.

Ritchie, Andrew. “The restitution of art loot.” Gallery Notes (Albright Art Gallery). 11 (July 1946): 3-10.

Roth, Cecil. “The restoration of Jewish libraries, archives and museums.” Contemporary Jewish Record. 8 (June 1944): 253-257.

Sarbib, Chloe. “What happened to all the art that Nazis looted? This Jewish Museum exhibit tells the story of several masterworks.” Jewish Telegraphic Agency. (5 September 2021)

Simpson, Elizabeth. “’The Spoils of War’: proceedings of the 1995 New York Symposium.” Spoils of War. 3 (December 1996): 27-29.

—. “Schliemann’s ‘Treasures’ from the Second City of Troy.” The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 191-193. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Schorch, Philipp. “Sensitive Heritage: Ethnographic Museums, Provenance Research, and the Potentialities of Restitutions.” Museum and Society. 18 (23 March 2020): 1-5.

Sinkoff, Nancy. “From the Archives: Lucy S. Dawidowicz and the Restitution of Jewish Cultural Property.” American Jewish History. 100.1 (January 2016).

Sion, Brigitte. “European Jewish Museums at a Turning Point.” Contact. 17. 3 (Summer 2016).

Smyth, Craig Hugh. “The establishment of the Munich Collection Point.” The spoils of war – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 126-130. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Stein, Laurie A. “Everyone Brings a Piece to the Puzzle: Conversations with Elaine Rosenberg and Reflections on Provenance Research among the Paul Rosenberg Archives.” Collections. 10 (September 2014): 279–290.

Steinweis, Alan E. “’Unreliable and unfit’: the Nazi purge of Jews and other ‘undesirables’ from German cultural life, 1933-45.” Holocaust Studies Annual. 3-22 (1991).

Sznaider, Natan. “Die Rettung der Bücher, Hannah Arendt in München (1949/1950).” Mittelweg. 36. 2 (2009).

Takei, Ayaka. “’The Gemeinde Problem’: The Jewish Restitution Successor Organization and the Postwar Jewish Communities in Germany, 1947-1954.” Holocaust and Genocide Studies. 16. 2 (Fall 2002).

Talbierska, Jolanta. “Researching Historical Library Collections to Discover the Past and Plan the Future.” Quaerendo. 46. 2-3 (2016): 178–191.

Talley, M. Kirby. “Lost treasures.” ARTnews. 89.2 (February 1990): 138+.

“Tentative List of Jewish Cultural Treasures in Axis-Occupied Countries.” New York: Commission on European Jewish Cultural Reconstruction. Jewish Social Studies. 8.1 (1946).

Thornes, Robin. “Protecting cultural objects through documentation standards.” Spoils of War.  2 (July 1996): 38-41.

Tully, Judd. “The war loot questions: no easy answer.” ARTnews. 94.6 (Summer 1995): 144.

“Unplundering art: when spoils of war seized from Germany are returned, where can the line be drawn on the repatriation of other art treasures?” Economist. 345.8048 (20 December 1997): 126+.

Urice, Stephen K. “Claims to ownership of the Trojan treasures”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 204-206. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Van Delft, Marieke. “CERL’s Work and Vision for Provenance Research II: The Provenance Digital Archive in CERL.” La Bibliofilia. 117. 3 (2015): 321-324.

Walker, John. “Europe’s looted art.” National Geographic. 89 (January 1946): 39-52.

Watson, Peter. “Battle over Hitler’s loot.” The Observer. 10683 (21 July 1996): 28.

Weber-Sinn, Kristin, and Paolo Ivanov. “‘Collaborative’ Provenance Research – About the (Im)Possibility of Smashing Colonial Frameworks.” Museum and Society. 18 (23 March 2020): 66–81.

Weinbaum, Laurence. “Righting a historic wrong: restitution of Jewish property in Central and East Europe.” Policy studies. 1. Jerusalem: World Jewish Congress (1995).

Weller, Matthias. Dewey, Anne. “Warum ein ‘Restatement of Restitution Rules for Nazi-Confiscated Art’? Das Beispiel ‘Fluchtgut’.” Kunst und Recht – KUR. 6 (2019): 170-178.

Wildenstein, Georges. “Works of art – weapons of war.” La République française (December 1943).

Wilson, David. “Return and restitution: a museum perspective.” Who owns the past? (1985): 99-106. (Paper presented at the annual symposium of the Australian Academy of the Humanites).

Young, Jacklyn. “Allied Forces: Libraries and Museums Collaborating on World War II Provenance Research.” Art Libraries Journal. 29.2 (2004): 33-36.

Zagorin, Adam. “Saving the spoils of war.” Time. 150. 23 (1 December 1997): 87-91.

Zaldumbide, Rodrigo Pallares. “Return and restitution of cultural property: cases for restitution.” Museum. 34.2 (1982).

Zuschlag, Christoph. “Globale Perspektive.” Kunstzeitung (August 2016): 4.

Austria:

Aldous, Tony. “Lost without trace.” History Today. 42 (August 1992): 2+.

Amit, Gish. “Ownerless Objects. The Story of the books Palestinians left behind.” Jerusalem Quarterly. 33 (2008).

—. “‘The Largest Jewish Library in the World’: The Books of Holocaust Victims and their Redistribution Following World War II.”  Dapim. Studies on the Holocaust. 27.2 (2012): 107-128.

Bator, Paul M. “An Essay on the International Trade in Art.“ Stanford Law Review. 34.2 (January 1982): 275-384.

Czernin, Hubertus. “Law of return.”  ARTnews. 97.10 (November 1998): 80.

Czernin, Hubertus. “The Austrian Evasion.”  ARTnews. 97.6 (November 1998): 112–119.

Decker, Andrew. “A legacy of shame.” ARTnews. 83.10 (December 1984): 54-82.

—. Esterow, Milton. “Austria’s bid for justice.” ARTnews. 95.11 (December 1996): 90.

—. Protzman, Ferdinand. “Vienna: complexity, contradictions.” ARTnews. 88.5 (May 1989): 63.

Esterow, Milton. “A little justice in Austria”. ARTnews. 94.7 (September 1995).

Faison, S. Lane ,. Jr. “Investigating art looting for the MFA&A”. The spoils of war – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 139-141. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Feliciano, Hector. “The Mauerbach Case: an equivocal sale. Part II.” Spoils of War.  3 (December 1996): 24-27.

“How the Republic of Austria forced the Rothschilds to donate art.” Der Standard. (14-15 February 1998).

Kronsteiner, Olga. “Der Makel von Mauerbach.” Der Standard. (29 October 2016).

Leistra, Josephine. “The Mauerbach Case. Part I.” Spoils of War. 3 (December 1996): 22-24.

Ritchie, Andrew C. “Return of art loot from and to Austria.” College Art Journal. 5.4 (May 1946): 353-357.

Sailer, Gerhard. “Austria”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 88-91. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Waxman, Sharon. “Austria: ending the legacy of shame.” ARTnews. 94.7 (September 1995): 122-125.

Waxman, Sharon. “Justice in Austria… finally?” ARTnews. 94.1 (January 1995): 154+.

Belgium:

Lust, Jacques. “The spoils of war removed from Belgium during World War II”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 58-62. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

—. “Recovery of Belgian artworks and libraries lost during the Second World War”. Cultural treasures moved because of the war: a cultural legacy of the Second World war: documentation and research on losses. (1995): 13-22. (Documentation of the International Meeting in Bremen, 30 November to 2 December 1994).

Brazil:

Hinchberger, Bill. “Brazil uncovers Nazi war loot.” ARTnews. (September 1998): 67.

Czech Republic:

Jirsek, Pavel. “Losses of cultural property from the territory of the Czech Republic due to World War II”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 232-233. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

France:

Adams, E. E. “Looted art treasures go back to France”. Quartermaster Review. 26 (September-October 1946): 16-23, 77-80, 83-84, 87.

Attias, Laurie. “Looking for loot at the Louvre.” ARTnews. 97.4 (April 1998): 74.

Eggen, J. B. “La commission Américaine pour la protection et le sauvetage des monuments d’art et d’histoire dans les zones de guerre (The American Commission for the Protection and Salvage of Artistic and Historic Monuments in War Areas)”. Mouseion.  55-56 (1946): 1-2.

Florisoone, Michel. “La commission française de récuperation artistique (French commission to recover artworks).” Mouseion. 55-56. 1-2 (1946): 67-73.

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. “L’ERR versus le RSHA: Les formes de pillage et de migration de livres et d’archives comme facteurs intervenant dans le processus de restitution.” Saisies, spoliations, restitutions. (2012): 37-65.

Hamon, Marie. “Spoliation and recovery of cultural property in France, 1940-1994.” The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 63-66. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Poulain, Martine. “De Mémoire de livres: Des livres spoliés durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale déposés dans les bibliothèques: une histoire à connaître et à honorer.“ Bulletin des bibliothèques de France. (January 2015): 176–90.

Riding, Alan. “Art looted by Nazis goes on show in Paris, seeking its owners.” New York Times. (25 October 1994): C15.

Robinson, Walter V. “The “Lost” masterpieces in France, an uneasy look inward.” Boston Globe. (16 March 1997).

Ross, Marvin C. “Kunstschutz in occupied France.” College Art Journal. 5 (May 1946): 336-352.

Sciolino, Elaine. “The Louvre’s Art Sleuth Is on the Hunt for Looted Paintings.” The New York Times. (16 July 2021).

Shapreau, Carla.  “The Loss of French Musical Property During World War II: Post-War Repatriations, Restitutions, and 21st Century Ramifications.” Berkeley Law. (8 January 2014).

Germany:

Bahrmann, Nadine. “Guide to provenance research. Numbers and lists in the ‘Kunstfund Gurlitt’.” Baresel-Brand, Andrea. Bahrmann, Nadine and Gilbert Lupfer (eds.). Kunstfund Gurlitt. Ways of research. Provenire. Series of publications by the German Center for Cultural Property Losses, Magdeburg. 2 (2020): 19-33.

Bambi, Andrea. “Alfred Flechtheim – Wegbereiter der Avantgarde. Provenienzforschung in deutschen Sammlungen. Einblicke in zehn Jahre Projektförderung.” Provenire. Schriftenreihe des Deutschen Zentrums Kulturgutverluste. 1 (2019): 225-232.

Brown, Kate. “The German Government Is Putting More Than $2 Million Behind Restitution Research into Objects from Colonial Contexts.” Artnet. (5 February 2019) news.artnet.com/art-world/germany-restitution-1456681. 

Dehnel, Regine. “NS-Raubgut in Museen, Bibliotheken und Archiven. Restitution, universitaere Forschung und Provenienzrecherche.” Zeitgeschichte online. (May 2014).

Decker, Andrew. “Nazi art returns to Germany”. ARTnews. 83.9 (November 1984): 143, 145.

Dege, Stefan. “Nazi-looted art: Germany struggles with restitution.” Deutsche Welle (21 June 2021)

Deinert, Mathias. “Indiziengestützte Detektivarbeit. Ergebnisse der Provenienzforschung am Potsdam Museum.” Museumsfenster. (2016): 60-71.

Deutscher Museumsbund (ed). “Die Biografie der Objekte. Provenienzforschung.” (Museumskunde. Fachzeitschrift für die Museumswelt. 80.2 (2015).

Deshmukh, Marion. “Recovering culture: the Berlin National Gallery and the U.S. occupation 1945-1949”. Central European History. 27(1994): 411-439.

Dewey, Anne. “Gerecht und fair? ‘Guter Glaube’ im Nachkriegsrecht und Lösung gegenwärtiger Raubkunstfälle – Teil I.” KUR – Kunst und Recht. 22. 6 (2020): 154-159.

Dornberg, John. “The mounting embarrassment of Germany’s Nazi treasures”. ARTnews. 88.7 (September 1988): 130-141.

Ebert, Anja and Timo Saalmann. “Provenienzforschung und Authentizität.” Thomas Eser  (ed.). Authentisierung im Museum: Ein Werkstatt-Bericht. RGZM – Tagungen. 32 (2017): 59–67.

Farmer, Walter I. “Custody and controversy at the Wiesbaden Collecting Point”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 131-134. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Fiedler, Wilfried. “Legal issues bearing on the restitution of German cultural property in Russia”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 175-177. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Forster, Peter. “Kulturelle Ausbeutung in der NS-Zeit. Provenienzforschung im Museum Wiesbaden 2009-2011.” Nassauische Annalen. 123 (2012): 635-665.

Frankfurter, Alfred M. “Return of the Dresden paintings”. ARTnews. 54 (February 1956).

Frank, Michael. “The Mystery of the Missing Jewish Books of Rome. Tracing the Fate of 25,000 volumes lost to the Holocaust.” Tablet Magazine. (3 November 2015).

Franz, Michael. “Lost Art und Recht.” KUR – Kunst und Recht.  22.6 (2020): 148-153.

Freitag, Gabriele. “Archival material on National Socialist Art plundering during the Second World War”. Spoils of War.  1 (December 1995): 34-36.

Gliszczynski, Vanessa von and Julia Friedel. “Collected. Bought. Looted? Provenance Research at the Weltkulurenmuseum Frankfurt.” Journal for Art Market Studies. 2 (1 May 2018).

Goldmann, Klaus. “The Trojan treasures in Berlin: the disappearance and search for the objects after World War II”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 200-203. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Haendschke, Susanne and Robert Vlcek. “„Sehr gut, billig!!“ Auktionskataloge, Anmerkungen und Provenienzforschung: Ein Projekt der Bibliothek im LVR-LandesMuseum Bonn.” Berichte aus der Arbeit des LVR-LandesMuseums Bonn. 1 (2014): 15-17.

Hahne, Charis. “Gerecht und fair? „Guter Glaube“ im Nachkriegsrecht und Lösung gegenwärtiger Raubkunstfälle – Teil II. Der Fall Galerie Heinemann in der deutschen Restitutionspraxis.” KUR – Kunst und Recht.  22.6 (2020): 159-164.

Hammond, Mason. “War and art treasures in Germany.” College Art Journal. 5 (March 1946): 205-218.

Hancock, Walker. “Experiences of a Monuments Officer in Germany.” College Art Journal. 5. 4 (May 1946): 271-311.

Heuss, Anja. “Archives in the Federal Republic of Germany on art theft: an overall view”. Cultural treasures moved because of the war: a cultural legacy of the Second World war: documentation and research on losse. (1995): 135-141. (Documentation of the International Meeting in Bremen, 30 November to 2 December 1994).

Heuss, Anja. “Der Klosterschatz Petschur (The Petschur Monastery treasure).” Kritische Berichte. 23.2 (1995): 44-51.

Hickley, Catherine. “Max Liebermann’s Heirs Compensated for Nazi-Looted Painting.” New York Times. (2 September 2021)

—. “Did the Nazis Force an Art Sale? The Question Lingers 88 Years Later.” The New York Times. (6 July 2021).

Honan, William H. “Germans to get priceless gospels lost in ’45.” New York Times (1 May 1990).

—. “Second missing manuscript turns up in German hands”. New York Times (16 June 1990).

Hopp, Meike. Klingen, Stephan. “Geraubte Raubkunst? Das Forschungsprojekt zum sog. “Führerbau-Diebstahl” am Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte München”. aviso. Zeitschrift für Wissenschaft und Kunst in Bayern. 3(2015): 24-27.

Kienle, Christiane. “Return to Dresden after decades: an exhibition of the State Galleries Dresden”. Spoils of War. 5 (June 1998): 35-37.

—. “The return of ivory sculptures to Germany”. Spoils of War. 3 (December 1996): 59-61.

Klessman, Eckart. “Von Bomben gerettet und doch verloren?”Art. 3 (March 1993): 44-53.

—. “Die Amerikaner beienten sich aus den Depots der Nazis.” Art. 8 (August 1993): 78-81.

Kline, Thomas R. “Recent developments in the recovery of Old Master drawings from Bremen.“ Spoils of War. 5 (June 1998): 15-19.

Klugmann, Claudia. “Kriegsverluste der Gemälde- und Pleastiksammlung des Museums der bildenden Künste.” Museum der Bildenden Künste. 7-40 (1994).

Koenigs, Christine F. “Under duress: the sale of the Franz Koenigs Collection”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 237-240. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Kotzsche, Dietrich. “Der Quedlinburger Schatz wieder vereint: 31 Oktober 1992 bis 30 Mai 1993 Museums-Journal. 7.1 (1993): 47-49.

Kuhn, Petra and Doris Lemmermeier. “Documentation and research of cultural losses related with World War II in the Federal Republic of Germany.” Cultural treasures moved because of the war: a cultural legacy of the Second World war: documentation and research on losses. Koordinierungsstelle der Länder. (1995): 91-102. (Documentation of the International Meeting in Bremen, 30 November to 2 December 1994).

Langer, Robert. “Provenienzforschung an der Stadtbibliothek Bautzen. Ein Bericht aus der sächsischen Provinz.” Provenienz & Forschung. 1 (2016): 24-29.

Petropoulos, Jonathan. “For Germany and themselves: the motivation behind the Nazi leaders plundering and collecting of art. Part II.” Spoils of War. 5 (June 1998): 28-35.

Prölß, Peter and Jürgen Weber. “Fördern und Fordern. Staatliche Förderung und bürgerschaftliches Engagement für die Provenienzrecherche und Restitution von geraubten Büchern. Arbeitsschritte in der Provenienzforschung.” Supralibros. 17 (2015): 5-7.

Ross, Marvin C. “Art storage in Germany reported as inadequate.” Museum News. 23 (1 December 1945): 6.

Russell, John. “Masterpieces caught between two wars.” New York Times. (3 September 1989).

Schwerdtfeger, Paula. “Vermacht. verfallen. verdrängt. Kunst und Nationalsozialismus (Städtische Galerie Rosenheim, 24.09. – 19.11.2017).” ArtHist.net. (31 January 2018).

Siehr, Kurt. “‘The Own History,’ Provenance Research in German Art Museums Compared with the Situation in Other Countries Hamburg (Germany) (February 20–22, 2002).” International Journal of Cultural Property. 11 (January 2002): 342–345.

Smale, Alison. “Germany to Continue Funding to Establish Provenance of Looted Art.” The New York Times. (4 March 2016).

Smale, Alison and Melissa Eddy. “German Officials Provide Details on Looted Art.” The New York Times. (5 November 2013).

Strzoda, Hanna. “Geschichten hinter den Werken – Provenienzforschung in der „Sammlung der Zeichnungen” am Kupferstichkabinett.” Jahrbuch Preußischer Kulturbesitz. 1 (2015): 124-151.

Tams, Christian. Lucas, Benedikt. “Der Welfenschatz vor dem Supreme Court.” KUR – Kunst und Recht.  22.6 (2020): pp. 142-147.

Hungary:

Beck, Ernest. “Hungary asks Russia for missing art treasures.” ARTnews. 91.4 (April 1992): 45+.

Fodor, Istvan. “The restitution of works of art in Hungary”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 92-94. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

—. “The restitution of works of art in Hungary”. Cultural treasures moved because of the war: a cultural legacy of the Second World war: documentation and research on losses, 79-84. Bremen: Koordinierungsstelle der Länder, 1995. (Documentation of the International Meeting in Bremen, 30 November to 2 December 1994).

Fraiman, Susan Nashman. “The Lost Portrait of Gutle Rothschild“. Judaica: Neue Digitale Folge. 1 (2020).

Manchin, Anna. “Staging Traumatic Memory: Competing Narratives of State. Violence in Post-Communist Hungarian Museums.” East European Jewish Affairs. 45. 2–3 (2015): 236–251.

Israel:

Keessen, Shirit Ovadia. “Every Object Has an Owner – Taking Responsibility on the Future of Looted Art.” International Conference RCI’20. Redefining Community in Intercultural Context Cluj-Napoca. (7-9 May 2020).  

Ireland:

“Art with a Dubious Past.” The Irish Times. (14 August 1998).

Italy:

Lee, Rensselaer W. “The effect of the war on Renaissance and Baroque art in Italy.” College Art Journal. 4. 2 (January 1945): 81-91. (Paper presented at the Archaeological Institute of America’s Symposium, “Europe’s Monuments as Affected by the War,” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, 28 December 1944).

Leonard, D. G. “Archives, bibliothèques et oeuvres d’art en Italie durant la guerre.” Revue historique.  202 (July 1949): 24-51.

Vagheggi, Paolo. “Capolavori d’arte prigionieri di Guerra.” La Republica. (21 February 1998).

Luxembourg:

Dostert, Paul. “Art recovery in Luxemburg”. Cultural treasures moved because of the war: a cultural legacy of the Second World war: documentation and research on losses, 103-108. Bremen:  Koordinierungsstelle der Länder, 1995. (Documentation of the International Meeting in Bremen, 30 November to 2 December 1994).

Moldova:

Shikhovas, Irina. “Inside the Museum: The Jewish Museum of Chișinău (Kishinev).” East European Jewish Affairs. 45.2–3 (2015): 321–322.

Netherlands:

Leistra, Josefine. “A short history of art loss and art recovery in the Netherlands”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 53-57. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

—. “New York Conference – Spoils of War.” Spoils of War. 0 (1995): 8-9.

—. “Art recovery in the Netherlands.” Cultural treasures moved because of the war: a cultural legacy of the Second World war: documentation and research on losses. Koordinierungsstelle der Länder. (1995): 28-42. (Documentation of the International Meeting in Bremen, 30 November to 2 December 1994).

Poland:

Cascone, Sarah. “A New Polish Law Will Make It Practically Impossible to Pursue Restitution Claims for Nazi-Looted Artworks.” Artnet. (16 August 2021).

Cieslinska-Lobkowicz, Nawojka. “The Demise of the World of the Gutnajers: The Warsaw Art Market in World War II.” Holocaust and Genocide Studies. 33.3 (Winter 2019): 333–350.

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. “A Goudstikker van Goyen in Gdańsk: A Case Study of Nazi-Looted Art in Poland“. International Journal of Cultural Property. 27 (2020): 53-96.

Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Barbara. “Inside the Museum: Curating between hope and despair: POLIN. Museum of the History of Polish Jews.” East European Jewish Affairs. 45. 2–3 (2015): 215–235.

Kowalski, Wojciech. “Internationaler Kulturgüterschutz in Europa: deutsch-polnische Fragen.” Kritische Berichte. 23.2 (1995): 52-57.

—. “Poland. Part I: Historical overview.” Spoils of War. 1 (December 1995): 22-24.

—. “World War II cultural losses of Poland: a historical issue or still a ‘hot’ political and legal topic.” The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 235-236. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Kuhnke, Monika. “Poland. Part II: Problems related to the recording of the war losses in the area of works of art.” Spoils of War. 1 (December 1995): 25-29.

Cieślińska-Lobkowicz, Nawojka. “Who Owns Bruno Schulz? The Changing Postwar Fortunes of Works of Art by Jewish Artists Murdered in Nazi-Occupied Poland”. March 2016.

Shapreau, Carla. “The Nazi Confiscation of Wanda Landowska’s Musical Collection and Its Aftermath.” Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry. 32 (2020).

Romania:

Julean, Dan-Ionuţ. “Reportage: Romania and its Jewish Museums.” East European Jewish Affairs. 45. 2–3 (2015): 279–289.

Russian Federation:

Akinsha, Konstantin. “The secret depositories slowly open.” ARTnews. 91.4 (April 1992): 48+.

—. “A Soviet-German exchange of war treasures?” ARTnews. 90.5 (May 1991): 1340-139.

—. “The turmoil over Soviet war treasures.” ARTnews. 90.10 (December 1991): 110-115.

—. “Duma does it.” ARTnews. 96.4 (April 1997): 65-66.

—. “Hermitage sequel.”  ARTnews. 96.3 (March 1997): 56.

—. “War loot: drawings for Deutsche Marks.” ARTnews. 91.7 (September 1992): 35.

—. “Russia: whose art is it.” ARTnews. 91.5 (May 1992): 100+.

— and Grigorii Kozlov. “Spoils of war: the Soviet Union’s hidden art treasures.” ARTnews. 90.4 (April 1991): 130-141.

—. “Yeltsin – repatriation is a long way off.” ARTnews. 91.6 (Summer 1992): 45+.

—. “Moscow: war loot – drawings for Deutsche marks.” ARTnews (September 1992).

—. “To return or not to return.” ARTnews. 93.8 (October 1994): 154+.

—. “Moscow: let the museums decide.” ARTnews (December 1992).

—. “Das Gold von Troja liegt in Moskau.” ARTnews. 4 (April 1993).

—. “The Soviets’ war treasures: a growing controversy.” ARTnews. 90.7 (September 1991): 112-119.

—. “The discovery of the secret repositories”. The Spoils of War World War II and Its Aftermath: The Loss, Reappearance, and Recovery of Cultural Property. (1997): 162-165. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Boguslavskij, M. M. “Contemporary legal problems of return of cultural property to its country of origin in Russia and the Confederation of Independent States.” International Journal of Cultural Property. 3.2 (1994): 243-256.

Gambrell, Jamey. “Will Russia return spoils of war?” Art in America. 83.3 (March 1995): 29.

Gershenson, Olga. “The Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center in Moscow: Judaism for the masses.” Journal of East European Jewish Affairs. 45.2-3 (2015): 158-173.

Glenny, Michael. “The Amber Room: what happened to the tsars’ greatest jewel? The story of a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.” Art & Antiques. (March 1989).

Goldmann, Klaus. “The Treasure of Troy: hidden history.” Spoils of War. 2 (July 1996): 12-13.

Grenzer, Andreas. “The Russian archives and their files: researching the Soviet losses of property.” Spoils of War. 1 (December 1995): 33-34.

—. “Research project. Fate of the Treasures of Art removed from the Soviet Union during World War II.” Cultural treasures moved because of the war: a cultural legacy of the Second World war: documentation and research on losses. (1995): 124-132. (Documentation of the International Meeting in Bremen, 30 November to 2 December 1994).

—. “Report on the archive situation in Russia as it relates to researching the losses of cultural property.” Cultural treasures moved because of the war: a cultural legacy of the Second World war: documentation and research on losses. (1995): 142-145. (Documentation of the International Meeting in Bremen, 30 November to 2 December 1994).

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. “‘Trophy’ archives and non-restitution: Russia’s cultural ‘Cold War’ with the European Community.” Problems of Post-Communism. 45.3 (May-June 1998): 3-16.

Hartung, Ulrike. “The ‘Sonderkommando Künsberg’: looting of cultural treasures in the USSR.” Spoils of War. 2 (July 1996): 14-16.

Hiller, Armin. “The German-Russian negotiations over the contents of the Russian repositories.” The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 179-185. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Hiller, Marlene P. “The documentation of war losses in the former Soviet Republics”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 81-83. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Hochfield, Sylvia. “St. Petersburg: will the Hermitage return the Degas.” ARTnews. 94 (March 1995).

—. “Under a Russian sofa: 101 looted treasures.” ARTnews. 92.4 (April 1993): 120-125.

—. “The Russians renege.” ARTnews. 93.6 (Summer 1994): 68+.

— “Twice stolen.” ARTnews. 94.4 (April 1995): 85-86.

—. “Nobody knows what to do next.” ARTnews. 94.5 (May 1995): 65-66.

—. “Do the right thing.” ARTnews. 97.2 (February 1998): 66.

—. “Will the Hermitage return the Degas?” ARTnews. 94.3 (March 1995): 48+.

—. “The Malevich legacy: heirs vs. museums.” ARTnews. 92.9 (November 1993): 65+.

—. “The Russian surprise.” ARTnews. (January 1999): 56-58.

—. “Wrestling with restitution.” ARTnews. (Summer 1998): 59.

—. “Back to the drawing room.” ARTnews. (December 1998): 61.

—. “Statute with limitations.” ARTnews. (November 1998): 57.

Hughes, Robert. “Russia’s secret spoils of World War II: the Hermitage in St. Petersburg breaks its silence on a hidden trove of Impressionis treasures.” Time. 144.16 (17 October 1994): 85.

Iakerson, Shimon. Shcherbakova, Marina. “Inside the Museum: A Museum in a museum—the experience of exhibiting Jewish collections in the Russian Museum of Ethnography, St. Petersburg.” East European Jewish Affairs. 45. 2–3 (2015): 326–329.

“Instances of repatriation by the USSR”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 145-147. (Summary of the symposium presentation by Irina Antonova at the international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Kasinec, Edward Solanus. “Russian Imperial and Elite Provenance Books: Their Afterlife in Post-World War II New York. School of Slavonic and East European Studies. 20 (2006): 36–45.

Kaspina, Maria and Hillel Kazovsky. “Inside the Museum: The Museum of Jewish History in Russia, Moscow.” East European Jewish Affairs. 45.2–3 (2015): 323–325.

Korkmazova, Evgenia. “Review of the 1997 Russian press on the issue of the restitution of cultural values. Part II.” Spoils of War. 5 (June 1998): 41-43.

Kostenevich, Albert. “Hidden treasures revealed: Impressionist masterpieces and other French paintings preserved by the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg.” (1995) (Catalog of the exhibition held at the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, opened 30 March 1995).

Kot, Sergei. “The Ukraine and the Russian Law on removed cultural values.” Spoils of War. 5 (June 1998): 9-15.

—. “Ancient Ukrainian mosaics and frescos lost during the war and now located in Russian museums.” Spoils of War. 5 (June 1998): 37-41.

Koulichov, Valery. “The history of the Soviet repositories and their contents.” The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 171-174. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Kuhn, Petra. “Comment on the Soviet returns of cultural treasures moved because of the war to the GDR.” Spoils of War.  2 (July 1996): 45-47.

Loudis, Jessica. “Haul of shame – the ‘trophy art’ taken from Germany by the Red Army.” Apollo. The International Art Magazine. (6 January 2020

Meisler, Stanley. “The Hermitage.” Smithsonian. 25 (March 1995): 40-41.

Meyer, Karl E. “The hunt for Priam’s treasure.” Archaeology. 46.6 (November-December 1993): 26+.

—. “Russia’s hidden attic: returning the spoils of World War II.” New York Times. (1 February 1995): A20.

—. “Who owns the spoils of war.” Archaeology. 48.4 (July 1995): 46-52.

Naimark, Norman M. “Cultural trophies.” The Russians in Germany: a history of the Soviet Zone of Occupation, 1945-1949. (1995): 175-178.

Nikandrov, Nikolai. “The transfer of the contents of German repositories into the custody of the USSR.” The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 117-120. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Ritter, Waldemar. “Die sowjetischen Trophänkommissionen: zur Verschleppung von Kunstschätzen aus deutschen Museen und Sammlungen.” Museums-Journal (Berlin). 10.4 (1996): 6-8.

Shvidkoi, Mikhail. “Russian cultural losses during World War II”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 67-71. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

“Spoils of war: impressionists at the Hermitage”. Economist. (15 April 1995): 80.

Tarsis, Irina. Varner, Elizabeth. “Reviewing the Agudas Chasidei Chabad v. Russian Federation, et al. Dispute.” American Society of International Law. (19 March 2014).

Tolstikov, Vladimir. “Some aspects of the preparation of the catalogue for the exhibition ‘the Treasure of Troy: Heinrich Schliemann’s excavations’ at the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow.” The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 212-213. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Serbia:

Fisher, Wesley. “Restitution of art, Judaica, and other cultural property plundered in Serbia during World War II.” Godina. XI (2014): 57–66.

Slovakia:

Borský, Maroš. “Inside the Museum: When Orthodox synagogue meets museum: the New Jewish Community Museum in Bratislava.” East European Jewish Affairs. 45. 2–3 (2015): 261–26.

Switzerland:

Buomberger, Thomas. “The baron’s share.” ARTnews. (November 1998): 75.

Tisa Francini, Esther. “Provenienzforschung in der Schweiz. Das Beispiel
des Museums Rietberg Zürich.” KUR. Kunst und Recht. 3.4 (2009):117-119.

—, and Alexandra von Przychowski. “Provenance Research into the Collection of Chinese Art at the Museum Rietberg: Switzerland and the Transnational History of the Art Market and Art Collections.” Journal for Art Market Studies. 2 (September 2018).

Ukraine:

Fedoruk, Alexander. “Ukraine: the lost cultural treasures and the problem of their return.” The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 72-76. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy. “The fate of Ukrainian cultural treasures during World War II: archives, libraries, and museums under the Third Reich.” Jahrbücher für Geschichte Osteuropas. 39.1 (1991): 53-80.

Vrublevskaya, Valentina and Sergei Kot. “Cultural property of the Ukraine lost as a result of World War II: problems of research and restitution.” Cultural treasures moved because of the war: a cultural legacy of the Second World war: documentation and research on losses. Bremen: Koordinierungsstelle der Länder. (1995): 109-123.

United Kingdom:

Quash, Susanna Avery and Christian Huemer. “London and the Emergence of a European Art Market, 1780-1820.” The Getty Research Institute. 1(2019).

Ryckman, Pamela and Dorit Straus. “Avoid Embarrassment by Establishing the Provenance of Artwork.” Financial Times. (29 April 2008).

United States:

Baumgartner, Tony. “A Tragic Fate: Law and Ethics in the Battle Over Nazi-Looted Art by Nicholas M. O’Donnell; Nazi-Looted Art and the Law: The American Cases. by Bruce L. Hay.”  Art, antiquity and law. 22.4 (2017): 363-366.

Bloom, Gabriella. “Museum Websites and Restitution: Rediscovering Holocaust-Era Objects in the Digital Age.” Sotheby’s Institute of Art. MA Theses. (2019): 1–88.

Bradsher, Greg. “Monuments Men and Nazi Treasures.” Prologue. 45.2 (October 2013).

Breitenbach, Edgar. “Historical survey of the Intelligence Department, MFAA Section, in OMGB, 1946-1949.” College Art Journal. 9 (Winter 1949-1950): 192-198.

Burlington Magazine. “Praising Provenance.” The Burlington Magazine. 143. 1176 (2001): 131-131.

Cascone, Sarah. “Restitution Experts Blast Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts for Refusing to Return a Painting Once Purchased for Hitler’s Museum.” Artnet (18 August 2021)

Congress. House. Committee on Armed Services. Authorization to Secretary of the Army to return certain works of art to the Federal Republic of Germany. Washington: GPO, 1981. 5 pp. (97th Cong. 1st sess., H.Rpt.97-298).

Congress. Senate. Committee on Armed Services. Temporary retention in the U.S. of certain German paintings. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1948. iii, 89 pp. (80th Cong. 2nd sess., S. Hrg., 1948).

Davis, Kelly. “The New Face of Provenance Research.” Getty Museum Blog. (27 February 2018).

Force, Christel. “Provenance Research: An Art Detective Traces the Life of Artwork.” The Met. (31 August 2018).

Freudenheim, Tom L. “Will everything become suspect?.” ARTnews. 97.3 (March 1998): 100.

Gambrell, Jamey. “First return of war booty.” Art in America. 83.6 (June 1995).

—. “Displaced art.” Art in America. 83.9 (September 1995): 88-95, 120.

Gramlich, Johannes. “Reflections on Provenance Research: Values – Politics – Art Markets.” Journal for Art Market Studies. 1. 2 (2017).

Greschler, Gabriel. “Investigation: San Francisco museums may hold Nazi-looted art.” The Jewish News of Northern California. (30 April 2021).

Grogan, David. “A quiet Texan, dead 10 years, is suddenly the prime suspect in a WWII theft of priceless medieval art.” People Weekly. 33.26 (2 July 1990): 48+.

Hall, Ardelia R. “The U.S. program for return of historic objects to countries of origin, 1944-1954.” Department of State Bulletin. 31.797 (4 October 1954): 493-498.

Heinzman, Elaine. “How U.S. and German Art Experts Are Teaming Up to Solve Nazi-Era Mysteries.” Smithsonian Magazine. (22 September 2017).

Honan, William H. “A trove of medieval art turns up in Texas.” New York Times. (14 June 1990): A1, D22.

—. “Texas bank admits it has missing art.” New York Times (19 June 1990): C18.

—. “Judge refuses to order silence about stolen art.” New York Times. (21 June 1990): B3.

—. “Church lawyers say stolen art was moved.” New York Times. (24 June 1990): 19.

—. “Germans send lawyers to Texas.” New York Times. (June 1990): C22.

—. “Letter show thief knew value of the Quedlinburg Treasures.” New York Times. (3 September 1994): A1.

—. “Case against heirs of art thief is all but over.” New York Times. (April 14, 1998): 14.

Huebner, Jeff. “Landscape of pain: the fight over Daniel Searle’s Degas which a Jewish family says was stolen by the Nazis”. Chicago. 47.5 (May 1998): 24+.

Hughes, Robert. “Hold those paintings! The Manhattan D.A. seizes alleged Nazi loot”. Time. 151.1 (12 January 1998): 70.

Jones, Kiana. “The Pedagogical Value of Provenance Research in Rare Book and Cultural Heritage Collections.” Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America. 37. 1 (2018).

Kline, Thomas R. “Recovering wartime losses and other stolen art and cultural property found in the United States”. Spoils of War. 3 (December 1996): 6-9.

—. “Legal issues relating to the recovery of the Quedlinburg Treasures.” The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 156-158. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

— and Willi A. Korte. “Archival material on National Socialist Art plundering during the Second World War.” Spoils of War. 1 (December 1995): 40-41.

Kommenda, Benedikt. “Schiele: Was alles gegen die Konfiszierung spricht, Experten verweisen auf einen US-Präzedenzfall, in dem ein eindeutig von den Nazis geraubtes Kunstwerk nicht den früheren Eigentümern zurückgegeben wurde.” Museum Security Mailinglist Reports. (March 1998).

Kuhn, Charles L. “German paintings in the National Gallery: a protest.” College Art Journal. 5.2 (January 1946).

Kunzelman, Charles J. “Some trials, tribulations, and successes of the Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives teams in the European theater during WWII.” Military Affairs. 52 (January 1988).

Kurtz, Michael.  “Resolving a Dilemma: The Inheritance of Jewish Property.” Cardozo Law Review. 20. 2 (1998/99).

Larkin, Catherine. “The William Randolph Hearst Archive at Long Island University: A Resource for Provenance Research.” The University of Chicago Press. 38 (1 March 2019): 78–94.

Lessing, Lauren. “Problems in Provenance Research.” Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America. 19. 2 (2000): 49-51.

Lowenthal, Constance. “German booty in Texas.” Wall Street Journal. (August 2, 1990).

—. “The Quendling embarrassment.” ARTnews. 91.6 (Summer 1992): 158.

—. “Stolen art: a positive move toward international harmony.” Museum News. 70.5 (September-October 1991): 22-23.

Lowry, Glenn D. “Testimony.” Washington: House of Representatives, 1998. (Testimony by Glenn D. Lowry, Director, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, before the House Banking & Financial Services Committee, in Washington, 12 February 1998).

Masurovsky, Marc and Pierre Ciric. “The U.S. Department of State Is Structurally Unable To Perform Appropriate Provenance Research On Immunity From Seizure Applications Submitted By Foreign Museums.“ Report by the Holocaust Art Restitution Project, 6 December 2016.

Maurer, Ely. “The role of the State Department regarding national and private claims for the restitution of stolen cultural property”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 142-144. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Miller, Meagan and Edward M Luby. “A Survey of World War II-Era Provenance Research in American Art Museums.” Collections A Journal for Museum and Archives Professionals. 1. 4 (May 2005): 365–380. 

Milosch, Jane C., Nicholas, Lynn H. and Megan M. Fontanella. “Provenance Research in American Institutions.” Collections: A Journal for Museum and Archives Professionals. 10.3 (Summer 2014).

Preiss, Kathy. “Cultural Policy in a Time of War: The American Response to Endangered Books in World War II.” Library Trends. 55.3 (2007).

Reynolds, Lisa. “An Art Provenance Research Guide for the Researcher and Librarian: A List of Resources.School of Information and Library Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Master’s thesis. April 2008.

Robinson, Walter V. “US tracked WWII influx of looted art: government did little to prevent sale of works here, files suggest.” Boston Globe. (9 May 1997): A1.

—. “An ignominious legacy: evidence grows of plundered art in US.” Boston Globe. (25 April 1997): A1.

Rosenbaum, Lee. “Will museums in U.S. purge Nazi-tainted art?” Art in America. 86.11 (November 1998): 37+.

Rubenstein, Raphael. “Schieles seized at MoMA.” Art in America. 86.2 (February 1998): 27.

Rubin, Dana. “A soldier’s secret.” Texas Monthly. 18.8 (August 1990): 82+.

Salisbury, Stephan. “Philadelphia Museum of Art will return historic shield stolen by Nazis from Czechoslovakia.” The Philadelphia Inquirer. (13 September 2021)

Sheppard, Elizabeth E. “Provenance Research in the 21st Century: Object History at the Menil Collection.” University of House-Clear Lake. Masters Project presented to the Faculty of the University of Houston-Clear Lake. (2018): 1–38.

Spencer, Ronald D. and Gary D Sesser. “Provenance: Important, Yes, But Often Incomplete and Often Enough, Wrong.” Artnet News. (26 June 2013).

Taper, Bernard. “Investigating art looting for the MFA&A”. The Spoils of War – World War II and its aftermath: the loss, reappearance, and recovery of cultural property. (1997): 135-138. (Paper presented at international symposium, The Spoils of War, sponsored by Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York, January 1995).

Totenberg, Nina. “Looted Nazi Art Again Before Supreme Court.” NPR. (7 December 2021)

Usborne, David. “America: ‘stolen’ Nazi art seized in New York.” The Independent.  (19 January 1998).

Online Resources:

Nazi-Era.” Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin College.  

Object Research: Provenance.” University of Libraries, University of Colorado Boulder.

Provenance Research.” Princeton University Art Museum.

Provenance Guidelines & Resources.Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University.

Provenance Research.” Harn Museum of Art, University of Florida.

Provenance Research Project.The Met Museum.

Stein, Laurie A. and Barbara Aikens. “A Guide to Provenance Research at the Archives of American Art.” Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

World War II-Era Provenance Research.” The Frick Collection.

Film:

mainstream movies:

Woman in Gold (2015)

The Monuments Men (2014)

Monsieur Klein (1976)

The Train (1964)

documentaries:

Looted Art in the Third Reich | DW Documentary (2020)

Chasing Portraits. A documentary film by Elizabeth Rynecki (2018)

Die Versteigerer – Profiteure des Holocaust (2018) []

Hitler contro Picasso e gli altri (2018)

70 years on, searching for artwork looted by the Nazis / PBS News Hour (2016)

Adele’s Wish (2015)

Nazi Stolen Art: The Final Restitution (2015)

The Art That Hitler Hated, part I/ BBC (2014)

The Art That Hitler Hated: The Sins of the Fathers, part II / BBC (2014)

Under the Hammer of the Nazis: The Lost Art of WWII (2013)

Portrait of Wally (2012)

Nazi Art Thieves (2011)

The Rape of Europa (2008)

Deutschland gegen Deutsch (2004)

Sonderauftag Führermuseum (2006)

Stealing Klimt (2007)

Goudstikker, a drifting inheritance (2006)

Bildersturm, der Kunstraub der Nazis (2003)

Treasure! In Search of Nazi plunder (1998)